Ignoring state threats, firm keeps sucking sand from Monterey Bay – San Francisco Chronicle

MARINA, Monterey County — The white pilothouse poking above the dunes on a remote beach in Monterey Bay is the first sign to visitors of an anachronistic industry that critics say is eating away California’s quintessential seacoast.

There, surrounded by dune grass, on the outskirts of this tiny community, is a dredging boat with rusting anchors and a hydraulic pipeline that stretches toward an inland factory building, where plumes of steam rise from a chimney.

The rig sucks up a slurry of sand and seawater that comes in with the tide and pipes it to the plant, where the granules are washed, graded, dried and taken out on trucks destined for golf course bunkers and less romantic consumer products like filtration systems, stucco and grout.

The Lapis Sand Plant, in operation since 1906, is the nation’s last coastal sand mine. It is believed to extract roughly 270,000 cubic yards of sand per year from a dredging pond on the beach, according to geologists and oceanographers who have studied the impacts. That’s the equivalent of a large dump truck load every half hour, 24 hours a day.

….

Read more: Ignoring state threats, firm keeps sucking sand from Monterey Bay – San Francisco Chronicle

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*